URGENT Your Action needed

Specifically to stop a Uranium in situ mine from killing the Aquifer that provides pristine water to four States. http://rapidcityjournal.com/news/local/communities/hot-springs/dewey-burdock-draft-permits-issued/article_daee3e02-0805-11e7-afd7-9342b7448e70.html
” Take Action!
1. Contact your Congressional Representatives
Use this form letter to create your own personalized letter to Congress.
2. Sign our Rootsaction.org Petition!
http://www.diy.rootsaction.org/p/cleanupthemines

You can also take action by printing this petition (PDF 132kb) and collecting signatures.

3. Spread the Word (click here for outreach materials)!
Online or offline, take action to get the message out!
You can also order 100 postcards for $9 here.

4. Write a Letter to the Editor
Writing a letter to the editor of local, regional, or national publications can be an effective way to ensure visibility of the issue! Be sure to follow the guidelines and word count limit of the publication (up to 250 words is typical for local and regional papers, but many larger newspapers are limited to 150 or so and some magazines limit letters to less than 100 words)

5. Endorse the Campaign
Click here to endorse the campaign.

6. Organize a Movie Night
You can screen some of the short videos from our youtube channel.
For additional movies visit: http://www.uraniumfilmfestival.org

7. Host a Teach-in
Coming soon!

8. Share Your Story
Click here to view testimonials and for the form to send us your story!

9. Host a Banner Making Party
Banner making parties can be a fun way to engage with others who care about the issue in your community.
It’s always good to have banners ready for actions!

Banner Making Party Tips ”
http://www.cleanupthemines.org/action/

A summary on you tube: ” Yellow Cradle to Grave (Uranium Mining Fallout } ”

Published on Jan 7, 2016
The nuclear industry is a many-headed toxic beast – nuclear power and nuclear weapons are just the most visible ones. Mining, milling, processing, reprocessing, manufacturing, and transporting nuclear materials are some other heads of the beast that are less visible. All are desecrating Mother Earth and killing her peoples. It’s time to deal with the initial stage of this problem. We can begin by cleaning up the abandoned uranium mines and placing a National Environmental Security Moratorium on all uranium extraction. https://www.popularresistance.org/the… USA Cows Fed Copper To Hide Radiated Gray Spots ☠ Lake By Uranium Mine Melts Steel!

surprise pop up bonus link Coldplay – Yellow https://youtu.be/yKNxeF4KMsY

USA Cows Fed Copper To Hide Radiated Gray Spots ☠ Lake By Uranium Mine Melts Steel! https://youtu.be/d1lMSpP9WYQ
Irresponsible corporations and negligent government agencies have abandoned more than 10,000 toxic uranium mines throughout the US. These hazardous mines poison our air, land and water and harm public health. Currently no laws require cleanup of these dangerous sites. A new campaign, Clean Up The Mines!, aims for remediation of these mines through federal legislation and action, and public education. Abandoned Uranium Mines (AUMs) The Environmental Protection Agency and US Geological Survey document over 10,000 abandoned uranium mines in the US, most in 15 western states on public, private, and tribal lands. Over 4,200 of these mines produced uranium that was sold to the US Atomic Energy Commission for use in nuclear weapons from the 1940s through the 1970s. Starting in the 1960s, much of the mining was done to provide fuel for nuclear power plants. There are several AUMs in and near the Grand Canyon, 169 of them within 40 miles of Mt. Rushmore, and eight right on the edge of Grand Teton / Yellowstone National Parks. One in seven (10 million) people in the western US lives within 50 miles of an AUM.

CLICK HERE TO SIGN THE PETITION TO CLEAN UP THE MINES AND ALL Future Uranium Mining Down! http://www.cleanupthemines.org/action/

AUM hazards and contamination pathways. Physical hazards of AUMs come from unmarked, unprotected mine entrances, cliffs, falling rocks, and collapsing buildings and equipment. Wind picks up radioactive dust from rock piles and blows it for miles people breathe fine particles into their lungs, resulting in much higher levels of lung cancer near AUMs. People carry the radioactive dust, dirt, and mud around on their clothes and shoes, spreading the contamination to their homes and families.

One of the decay elements of uranium is radon gas. It seeps up through the ground in many areas around mine sites where people and animals breathe it in. Exposure to radon gas is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the US. Water picks up radiation in a variety of ways – rain washes radioactive dust from the air and rocks and carries it into streams and rivers. Surface and underground water dissolve uranium from rock and dust. This is particularly true of uranium that has been exposed to oxygen, which changes it from UIV to UVI, which is more soluble in water. (This is the principle used in ‘In Situ Leaching’, similar to fracking techniques, the method most commonly used now.) The result is polluted rivers, lakes, and aquifers, with no safe available drinking water for thousands of communities.

Music From Anonymous No copyright Free background music.
☢For the latest Follow Stronitum Milks ☠ https://www.youtube.com/user/Fukushim… ☠ “

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to URGENT Your Action needed

  1. sandyfl100 says:

    And here is the real urgency as well, http://rapidcityjournal.com/news/local/communities/hot-springs/dewey-burdock-draft-permits-issued/article_daee3e02-0805-11e7-afd7-9342b7448e70.html
    ” HOT SPRINGS – On Monday, March 6, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced that it issued two draft permits and an “aquifer exemption” for the Dewey Burdock in-situ uranium mining project.

    EPA says it is seeking public comment on these permits and the exemption, and will conduct “information sessions,” combined with public hearings, on several dates between April 28 and May 11 (see below for dates and times). EPA will also accept public comments on the draft permits and a proposed aquifer exemption through May 19. “

  2. sandyfl100 says:

    HOT SPRINGS – On Monday, March 6, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced that it issued two draft permits and an “aquifer exemption” for the Dewey Burdock in-situ uranium mining project.

    EPA says it is seeking public comment on these permits and the exemption, and will conduct “information sessions,” combined with public hearings, on several dates between April 28 and May 11 (see below for dates and times). EPA will also accept public comments on the draft permits and a proposed aquifer exemption through May 19.
    http://rapidcityjournal.com/news/local/communities/hot-springs/dewey-burdock-draft-permits-issued/article_daee3e02-0805-11e7-afd7-9342b7448e70.html

  3. sandyfl100 says:

    A FB Share of 2 years ago~~ Why is the EPA Taking comments, yet again, two years later ! ? ! ?
    Quote begin from this share ” The EPA is taking comments until April 27 on the proposed rule on groundwater protection standards for uranium in situ leach mining. ” End Quote Dang Where are their Brains and their Hearts ????
    March 23, 2015 at 9:34pm ·
    About the Free Benefit Concert , please see concert speaker, Dr. Don Kelley’s comments~~~ { “It is critical that everyone who is against this mine gets involved in the decision-making process. Your voice matters. Your time matters. Your money matters,” Jarding said in announcing the concert. “The water cannot speak for itself –– we must speak for the water.”
    The EPA is taking comments until April 27 on the proposed rule on groundwater protection standards for uranium in situ leach mining.
    Renewable energy sources are an alternative to nuclear power, which fuels the demand for uranium mining, according to concert speaker Dr. Don Kelley.
    “When told that uranium mining and nuclear power plants are essential for the transition away from fossil fuels, remember that this belief is heavily promoted by big mining and energy interests,” Kelley said.
    “Realistic studies are showing that with commercially available renewable-energy technologies, 80-100 percent of U.S. electricity needs can be met by 2050,” Kelley said.
    Kelley is a member of the South Dakota State Medical Association, whose governing council voted unanimously to oppose Black Hills uranium mining. Among its reasons:
    • The “real possibility of underground water-supply contamination with radionuclides and other heavy metals exists” due to potential communication between the mined Inyan Kara aquifer and other aquifers.
    • Records of other ISL uranium mines detailing “frequent unanticipated consequences due to leaks and excursions of mining fluids.”
    • The acceptance by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission that “the restoration of an ISL-mined aquifer to pre-mining water quality is … impossibility.”
    For renewables to outpace nuclear energy, “what’s needed is grassroots activism and political leadership,” Kelley said.
    The concert begins at 1 p.m. with original folk music from the heart of the Black Hills by singer-songwriter and music critic Steve Thorpe.
    The Hill City Slickers will offer acoustic instruments and vocal harmonies, performing selections from their repertoire of folk, bluegrass, and western music, as well as gospel, original compositions, and favorites from the 50s and 60s.
    James Van Nuys is set to play numbers from a broad variety of original and traditional folk, blues, Irish and ragtime tunes that have earned him recognition as the Black Hills’ premier guitar finger-picker.
    Darren Thompson brings his Ojibway flute music from the Lac du Flambeau Nation in Wisconsin } . . . .

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s